Publications

Flow Cytometry Publications - D. melanogaster (fruit fly)

A large-scale, in vivo transcription factor screen defines bivalent chromatin as a key property of regulatory factors mediating Drosophila wing development.

Schertel C¹, Albarca M, Rockel-Bauer C¹, Kelley NW, Bischof J¹, Hens K, van Nimwegen E, Basler K¹, Deplancke B¹.
April 25, 2015
Genome Res. 2015 Apr;25(4):514-23. doi: 10.1101/gr.181305.114. Epub 2015 Jan 7.

1Institute of Molecular Life Sciences, University of Zurich, 8057 Zurich, Switzerland

Large-scale imaginal disc sorting: a protocol for "omics"-approaches.

Marty F, Rockel-Bauer C, Simigdala N, Brunner E, Basler K.
April 12, 2014
Methods. 2014 Apr 12. pii: S1046-2023(14)00149-2. doi: 10.1016/j.ymeth.2014.04.005. [Epub ahead of print]

Institute of Molecular Life Sciences, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich, CH.

Small molecule drug screening in Drosophila identifies the 5HT2A receptor as a feeding modulation target.

Gasque G, Conway S, Huang J, Rao Y, Vosshall LB.
July 02, 2013
Sci Rep 2013;3:srep02120.doi:10.1038/srep02120

The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, Box 63, New York, NY 10065, U.S.A.

Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals a Major Role in Cell Fate Maintenance and an Unexpected Role in Endoreduplication for the Drosophila FoxA Gene Fork Head

Rika Maruyama, Elizabeth Grevengoed, Peter Stempniewicz, Deborah J. Andrew
June 16, 2011
PLoS ONE 6(6): e20901. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0020901

Department of Cell Biology, The Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America

The CrebA/Creb3-like transcription factors are major and direct regulators of secretory capacity

Rebecca M. Fox, Caitlin D. Hanlon, and Deborah J. Andrew
November 01, 2010
Published November 1, 2010 // JCB vol. 191 no. 3 479-492

Department of Cell Biology, The Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205

Stwl modifies chromatin compaction and is required to maintain DNA integrity in the presence of perturbed DNA replication.

Yi X, de Vries HI, Siudeja K, Rana A, Lemstra W, Brunsting JF, Kok RM, Smulders YM, Schaefer M, Dijk F, Shang Y, Eggen BJ, Kampinga HH, Sibon OC
November 20, 2009

Department of Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, Division of Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, 9713 AV Groningen, The Netherlands.

Abstract:

Hydroxyurea, a well-known DNA replication inhibitor, induces cell cycle arrest and intact checkpoint functions are required to survive DNA replication stress induced by this genotoxic agent. Perturbed DNA synthesis also results in elevated levels of DNA damage. It is unclear how organisms prevent accumulation of this type of DNA damage that coincides with hampered DNA synthesis. Here, we report the identification of stonewall (stwl) as a novel hydroxyurea-hypersensitive mutant. We demonstrate that Stwl is required to prevent accumulation of DNA damage induced by hydroxyurea; yet, Stwl is not involved in S/M checkpoint regulation. We show that Stwl is a heterochromatin-associated protein with transcription-repressing capacities. In stwl mutants, levels of trimethylated H3K27 and H3K9 (two hallmarks of silent chromatin) are decreased. Our data provide evidence for a Stwl-dependent epigenetic mechanism that is involved in the maintenance of the normal balance between euchromatin and heterochromatin and that is required to prevent accumulation of DNA damage in the presence of DNA replication stress.

In vivo proteomics in Drosophila melanogaster by tandem affinity purification of protein complexes and analysis by Protein Center software

ABRF 2008, Feb 9-12, Salt Lake City, Utah
J.S. Rees1 , M. BBern2 , D. St Johnston1, K. Lilley1
February 09, 2008

1University of Cambridge, Cambride, UK;  2Proxeon, Odense, Denmark

Genome-wide mapping and characterisation of protein expression and interaction in Drosophila melanogaster, using a hybrid piggyBac/P-element YFP gene trap system with tandem affinity tags

48th Annual Drosophila Research Conference, March 7 – 11, 2007
E. Ryder1, H. Spriggs1, G. Johnson1, E. Drummond1, J. Drummond1, J. Webster1, J. Roote1, N. Lowe2, K. Lilley3, S. Hester3, J. Howard3, J. Rees3, S. Russell1, 3, D. St. Johnston2.
March 07, 2007

1. Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3EH. UK. 2. The Wellcome Trust/Cancer Research UK Gurdon Institute, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2. 1QN. 3. Cambridge Systems Biology Centre, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1QR

Exploring Strategies for Protein Trapping in Drosophila

Ana T. Quiñones-Coello*,1, Lisa N. Petrella*,1, Kathleen Ayers*,1, Anthony Melillo*, Stacy Mazzalupo*,2, Andrew M. Hudson*, Shu Wang*,3, Claudia Castiblanco*, Michael Buszczak†,‡, Roger A. Hoskins§ and Lynn Cooley*,†,**,4
March 01, 2007
Genetics, Vol. 175, 1089-1104, March 2007, Copyright © 2007
doi:10.1534/genetics.106.065995

* Department of Genetics, ** Department of Cell Biology and Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, Department of Embryology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 and §Department of Genome Biology, Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720

The Carnegie Protein Trap Library: A Versatile Tool for Drosophila Developmental Studies

Michael Buszczak*, Shelley Paterno*, Daniel Lighthouse*, Julia Bachman*, Jamie Planck*, Stephenie Owen*, Andrew D. Skora*, Todd G. Nystul*, Benjamin Ohlstein*, Anna Allen*, James E. Wilhelm*, Terence D. Murphy*, Robert W. Levis*, Erika Matunis, Nahathai Srivali*, Roger A. Hoskins and Allan C. Spradling*,1
March 01, 2007
Genetics, Vol. 175, 1505-1531, March 2007, Copyright © 2007
doi:10.1534/genetics.106.065961

*Howard Hughes Medical Institute Research Laboratories, Department of Embryology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, Department of Cell Biology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 and Department of Genome Biology, Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720

An efficient promoter trap for detection of patterned gene expression and subsequent functional analysis in Drosophila.

Larsen C, Franch-Marro X, Hartenstein V, Alexandre C, Vincent JP.
November 21, 2006
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Nov 21;103(47):17813-7. Epub 2006 Nov 8.

Microarray-based screens to identify genes specific to the fusion-competent myoblasts. (874A) (Poster)

46th Annual Drosophila Research Conference, March 30 – April 3, 2005
Shruti Haralalka, Susan Abmayr.
March 30, 2005

Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, MO 64110.

Gene expression profiling during gliogenesis in Drosophila.

46th Annual Drosophila Research Conference, March 30 – April 3, 2005
Becker A.
March 30, 2005

Institute of Genetics, University of Mainz, Germany

High throughput collection of Drosophila embryos for homozygous lethal mutants based on deformed driven YFP expression

46th Annual Drosophila Research Conference, March 30 – April 3, 2005
Bo Wang1, Julia Thompson1, Greg Beitel2 and Rock Pulak1
March 30, 2005

1) Union Biometrica Inc., 84 October Hill Road, Holliston, MA 01746 USA; 2) Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Cell Biology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208.

Sex-specific GFP-expression in Drosophila embryos and sorting by COPAS flow cytometry technique (#615C).

45th Annual Drosophila Research Conference, March 24-28, 2004
Julia Thompson1, Patricia Graham2, Paul Schedl2 and Rock Pulak1
March 24, 2004

1) Union Biometrica Inc (Holliston, MA USA), 2) Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University (Princeton, NJ USA).

Drosophila Fluorescent-Imaginal Disc Analysis and Sorting by COPAS Flow Cytometry Technique (412A).

45th Annual Drosophila Research Conference, March 24-28, 2004
Daniela Panáková1, Lydia Michaut2, Rico Bongaarts3, Bo Wang4, Julia Thompson4, Rock Pulak4
March 24, 2004

1) Max Planck Institute, CBG, Susan Eaton Lab (Dresden, Germany), 2) Biozentrum, Walter Gehring lab (Basel, Switzerland), 3) Union Biometrica (Geel, Belgium), 4) Union Biometrica Inc. (Holliston, MA, USA).

Flytrap, a database documenting a GFP protein-trap insertion screen in Drosophila melanogaster.

Reed J. Kelso, Michael Buszczak1, Ana T. QuinÄones2, Claudia Castiblanco2, Stacy Mazzalupo2 and Lynn Cooley2,3,*
January 01, 2004
Nucleic Acids Research (2004) Vol. 32, Database issue

Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA

1) Department of Embryology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Baltimore, MD 21210, USA 2) Department of Genetics, and 3) Department of Cell Biology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-8005, USA

A report on the 62nd Annual Meeting for the Society for Developmental Biology (SDB), Boston, USA, 30 July to 3 August 2003, "Developments in developmental genomics."

Holly A Field1 and Kevin P White2
July 30, 2003
Genome Biology 2003, 4:345

1) Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA; 2) Department of Genetics, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520, USA

Instrumentation for analysis and sorting of fluorescence patterns in transgenic Drosophila embryos, #1001B.

44th Annual Drosophila Research Conference, March 5-9, 2003
R. Pulak, B. Moellers, J. Thompson, B. Wang
March 05, 2003

Life Sciences, Union Biometrica, Inc. (Holliston, MA.)

Binding site for p120/-catenin is not required for Drosophila E-cadherin function in vivo.

Anne Pacquelet, Li Lin and Pernille Rørth
January 27, 2003
The Journal of Cell Biology (2003) Vol. 160, # 3, pp. 313-319

European Molecular Biology Laboratory, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany

High Throughput Protein Trapping in Drosophila, #982A.

43rd Annual Drosophila Research Conference, April 10-14, 2002
M.H. Buszczak1, X. Morin2, A.T. Quinones 3, W. Chia 2, L. Cooley 3,4
April 10, 2002

Dept MCDB, Yale Univ, New Haven, CT; 2) Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, King's College London, Guy's Hospital, London, UK; 3) Dept Genetics, Yale Univ, New Haven, CT; 4) Dept Cell Biology, Yale Univ, New Haven, CT.

Using Protein Traps to Study Genes Expressed during Oogenesis, #608B.

43rd Annual Drosophila Research Conference, April 10-14, 2002
A.T. Quiñones1, M. Buszczak1, X. Morin2, W. Chia2, L. Cooley1
April 10, 2002

1) Genetics, Yale University, New Haven, CT; 2) MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology, King's College London, New Hunts House, Guy's Hospital, London, UK.

A rapid and efficient approach to vital enhancer trap screening in Drosophila embryos, #143.

43rd Annual Drosophila Research Conference, April 10-14, 2002
S.S. Gisselbrecht1, J. Bayes1, J. Etchin1, B. Dell'Orfano2, A. Ferrante2, A.M. Michelson1
April 10, 2002

Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; 2) Union Biometrica, Inc., Holliston, MA.

Developing a Drosophila high throughput screen technology, #949A.

42nd Annual Drosophila Research Conference, March 21-25, 2001
Li, H.H., Wang, Q., Shi, X. and Zusman, S.
March 21, 2001

S. Dept. of Functional Genomics, Novartis Biomedical Research Institute (Summit NJ)

Fully Automated Instrumentation for Gene Function Analysis in D. melanogaster, #956B (p. a330).

42nd Annual Drosophila Research Conference, March 21-25, 2001
Kalutkiewicz, P., Holcombe, B., Clover, R. and Chouinard, S.*
March 21, 2001

Union Biometrica, Inc. (Holliston, MA), *Cambria Biosciences, LLC (Bedford, MA)

 

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